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Free Range VHDL

the no-frills guide to writing powerful code for your digital implementations.

Bryan Mealy, Fabrizio Tappero • Boek • paperback

  • Samenvatting
    This book is a fundamental guide to develop the skills necessary to write powerful VHDL code.
    The approach taken by this book is to provide only what you need to know to get up and running quickly in VHDL. As with all learning, once you have obtained and applied some useful information, it is much easier to build on what you know as opposed to continually adding information that is not directly applicable to the subjects at hand.
    VHDL is an extremely powerful tool. The more you understand as you work and study with VHDL, the more it will enhance your learning experience independently of your particular area of interest. The concept of using software to design hardware that is controlled by software will definitely provide you with endless hours of contemplation.

    Free PDF available here: http://www.freerangefactory.org/dl/free_range_vhdl.pdf
  • Productinformatie
    Binding : Paperback
    Distributievorm : Boek (print, druk)
    Formaat : 160mm x 240mm
    Aantal pagina's : 190
    Uitgeverij : Free PDF available here | freerangefactory.org
    ISBN : Niet bekend
    Datum publicatie : 01-2018
  • Inhoudsopgave
    Acknowledgments v
    Purpose of this book 1
    1 Introduction To VHDL 5
    1.1 Golden Rules of VHDL 8
    1.2 Tools Needed for VHDL Development 8
    2 VHDL Invariants 11
    2.1 Case Sensitivity 11
    2.2 White Space 11
    2.3 Comments 12
    2.4 Parentheses 12
    2.5 VHDL Statements 13
    2.6 if, case and loop Statements 13
    2.7 Identifiers 14
    2.8 Reserved Words 15
    2.9 VHDL Coding Style 15
    3 VHDL Design Units 17
    3.1 Entity 18
    3.2 VHDL Standard Libraries 22
    ii
    3.3 Architecture 23
    3.4 Signal and Variable Assignments 23
    3.5 Summary 25
    3.6 Exercises 26
    4 VHDL Programming Paradigm 29
    4.1 Concurrent Statements 30
    4.2 Signal Assignment Operator “
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Fragment

VHDL has a rich and interesting history1
. But since knowing this history
is probably not going to help you write better VHDL code, it will only be
briefly mentioned here. Consulting other, lengthier texts or search engines
will provide more information for those who are interested. Regarding
the VHDL acronym, the V is short for yet another acronym: VHSIC
or Very High-Speed Integrated Circuit. The HDL stands for Hardware
Description Language. Clearly, the state of technical affairs these days has
done away with the need for nested acronyms. VHDL is a true computer
language with the accompanying set of syntax and usage rules. But, as
opposed to higher-level computer languages, VHDL is primarily used to
describe hardware. The tendency for most people familiar with a higherlevel computer language such as C or Java is to view VHDL as just another
computer language. This is not altogether a bad approach if such a view
facilitates the understanding and memorization of the language syntax and
structure. The common mistake made by someone with this approach is
to attempt to program in VHDL as they would program a higher-level
computer language. Higher-level computer languages are sequential in
nature; VHDL is not.

Free PDF available here: http://www.freerangefactory.org/dl/free_range_vhdl.pdf ×
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